Danger of energy-saving bulbs – be aware

 

Energy-saving Bulb Dangers

Posted by  on Sep 11, 2012 in Heavy Metals | Comments Off

WARNING:  Contains GRAPHIC images 

I have not posted these images as I am squeamish (!) but they are available at this link for those who wish to see them :
http://www.drbuttar.com/energy-saving-bulb-dangers/

 

The following was taken from the April 2012 Salisbury Fire Department Newsletter.  You will be absolutely amazed at it’s contents.  Don’t miss reading a word of this posting, YOUR LIFE MAY DEPEND UPON the knowledge you gain from reading this posting.

Energy-saving Bulb Dangers 

By Lt. James L. Jester

By now, we have all seen them.  We probably all have some in our homes. We most certainly have come into contact with them in the homes to which we respond.  I am talking about energy-saving light bulbs. They have many different names; compact fluorescent lamp (CFL), compact fluorescent light, and compact fluorescent tube, all describe a fluorescent lamp designed to replace an incandescent lamp. Compared to their incandescent brothers producing the same amount of visible light, CFLs consume less power (from 1/5 to 1/3) and have a longer service life (8 to 15 times).

But the news in our quest to be better stewards of our planet is not all good. These CFLs have a small electronic ballast in their base. There is a fire hazard associated with these ballasts, but that is a conversation for another day. Let’s talk about another danger posed by these “green” lamps: mercury exposure and poisoning.

Like all fluorescent lamps, CFLs contain mercury. This fact not only complicates their disposal under normal conditions, the problem is exacerbated when the lamp is broken and the mercury is allowed “out of its box.” The symptoms of mercury poisoning typically include sensory impairment (vision, hearing, and speech), a lack of coordination, skin discoloration, tingling, itching, burning or pain, and desquamation (shedding of skin).

Mercury in lamps is typically present as either elemental mercury liquid, vapor, or both, since the liquid readily evaporates at room temperature. When broken indoors, lamps may emit sufficient mercury vapor to present health concerns. Breakage of multiple lamps presents a greater concern.  Injection of mercury into the body through broken glass that is contaminated is of particular concern.

Here is the scenario:
You are dispatched to The Smith residence for a laceration to the foot. Routine run huh? Nope. What you were not told is that Mr. Smith uses CFL lamps in his home. One of those lamps burned-out, and Mr. Smith did not wait for the lamp to cool down before he stood on a chair and removed it. Because the lamp was hot to the touch, Mr. Smith dropped it. As the lamp hit the floor, it exploded. As Mr. Smith descended from the chair he stepped, barefooted, into the broken glass and exposed mercury.
Here is what Mr. Smith’s foot looked like during his 2-week stay in ICU:

visual removed

At one stage it was feared that his foot would need to be amputated. Currently his foot is connected to a vacuum pump to remove continuously dead tissue.

The following are the recommended actions to take in the event of a broken CFL.

  • Evacuate the room, taking care not to step on the broken glass littering the floor
  • Ventilate the room for a MINIMUM of 15 minutes (EPA recommendation)
  • DO NOT clean the debris of the broken lamp with a vacuum cleaner as this will spread toxic mercury droplets throughout the house either immediately or upon the future use of the vacuum
  • Don protective gloves (I’ll be the one in SCBA too!); use a broom or brush to sweep the debris into a dustpan; empty the contents of the dustpan into a plastic bag; seal the plastic bag
  • DO NOT dispose of the plastic bag into an ordinary refuse receptacle
  • The debris is lawfully a Hazardous Material and must be disposed of accordingly

Depending on the severity of the spill, a more thorough clean-up regimen may need to be employed. Private companies exist that specialize in this type of operation.  Mercury is a toxin, and should be treated with the utmost of care and respect. A CFL may look benign, and make you feel good about “going green,” but once the poison is “out of its box” and able to cause an exposure, it’s a brand new deal.   Stay Safe folks!

 

For a downloadable copy of this article, click this link  Salisbury_Fire_Dept_Training_Newsletter_-_April_2012


Clean naturally with salt

25 Ways to naturally clean with salt

I am continuing my natural cleaning series with 25 ways to naturally clean with salt.  Be sure to check out my other posts on cleaning with vinegarcream of tartarlemon, and baking soda.  For now lets grab the salt from the pantry and put it to work around the home. 

A collection of 25 great ways to naturally clean your home using salt.  Put your pantry to work with these great cleaning ideas.

Always test any new cleaner on an inconspicuous area of any surface.

  1. Shine metal with equal parts salt, flour, and vinegar.
  2. Clean cast iron cookware when hot with a paste of oil and salt.
  3. Clean carpet spots with equal parts salt, vinegar, and borax.
  4. Apply salt to freshly spilled liquids on carpet.  Vacuum up after it dries.
  5. Add salt immediately to burnt food in pots for easy removal.
  6. Sprinkle a little salt in stinky shoes to help eliminate odors.
  7. Mix 1 part salt to 4 parts rubbing alcohol to treat grease stains on carpet.
  8. Make a paste of cooking oil and salt to clean water rings from your wood furniture.
  9. Rub salt on tea or coffee stained cups to remove marks.
  10. Fill your coffee pot with water and add 4 tablespoons of salt.  Boil to clean.
  11. Brighten your wood cutting boards by rubbing with a damp cloth and salt.
  12. Restore your sponges by soaking in cold saltwater.
  13. Sprinkle salt on paper then run over it with your hot iron to remove any sticky spots.
  14. Remove deposits from vases by rubbing with salt.
  15. Mix 2 tablespoons salt with 1 teaspoon vinegar and use to shine your chrome faucets.
  16. Remove rust from metal with a salt, cream of tartar, and water paste.  Apply paste then sit in sun to dry.
  17. Mix 1 part salt to 4 parts vinegar to remove soap scum.
  18. Sprinkle salt in doorways and window sills to deter ants.
  19. A damp cloth that has been soaked in salt water makes an excellent dust rag.
  20. Add one tablespoon of salt to a gallon of water to mop your floors.
  21. Add one cup of salt to the washer when you are cleaning your new blue jeans or towels.  The salt will set the dye and keep them from fading.
  22. Place artificial flowers in a bag with 1/4 cup salt and shake to remove dust.
  23. Toss salt on oven or stove spills while they are still liquid.  Wipe up when cool.
  24. Pour 1/2 cup of salt directly into your garbage disposal to clean and freshen.
  25. Remove odors from your hands by rubbing with a lemon wedge dipped in salt.
Be sure to test these methods on an inconspicuous area on any surface before cleaning.  Don’t forget to bookmark this page for future reference as well as my other natural cleaning guides.  Clean your home with vinegarcream of tartar,lemoncorn starchsteam, and baking soda as well as salt.  Go to your pantry and start naturally cleaning with salt today.

Bedbugs anyone?

Top 17 Natural Ways To Get Rid of Bedbugs

Top 17 Natural Remedies For Bedbugs

What Are Bedbugs?

The ancient bedtime verse “sleep tight, and don’t let the bugs bite” may, in reality, be hitting the bull’s eye more than many people realize. These obnoxious and notorious “travelers” are a significant problem and although their incidence declined during the 20th century, they have been on the rise again since 1995.  They can be transported inadvertently by innocent persons via luggage, bedding, clothing, furniture, etc.

Despite their small size, bedbugs are arguably the kings of their field. They can infest an entire apartment building or hotel, and they have been in the business of being a parasitic insect since ancient times. Bedbugs are mentioned in medieval European texts and classical Greek writings. [1]

Bedbugs are wingless insects of brownish color. Their sizes range from a quarter inch to a half inch in length, more or less similar to ticks in appearance. They appear flat and oval-shaped – like an apple seed. [2] They belong to a family of small parasitic insects known as Cimicidae, all members of which feed exclusively on mammalian blood. After a blood meal, their bodies bulge and their color changes from brownish to reddish. [3]Bedbugs are so named because of their distinctive taste to live nearby or inside of beds and beddings and to stay active at night to feed on their hosts – who are usually unaware of their presence.

Why Bedbugs Need to Be Eliminated

Bedbugs adeptly utilize their beak-like mouth to pierce human skin and, consequently, draw out blood for their nutrition. Nasty bedbug bites are among the reasons why bedbugs have gained their notoriety. Some people do not react to bedbug bites, [2] but for those who do react to them, bedbugs can be a terrible pest infestation.

Bedbug bites usually manifest as a swollen, white ridge or wheal on the bite location of the skin. They may be unnoticeable for others, whereas in some, they may be characterized by pronounced itching to the extent that severe hypersensitivity allergic reactions clinically manifest in the form of asthma, hives, and the like.

A few people suffer also from a form of anxiety disorder from bedbug bites, where they keep on imagining being bitten even when it is not happening, and this leads to their being anxious. Their anxiety in turn may result in sleeplessness, which could further affect their overall well-being.

Why Bedbugs Are Sometimes Hard to Eliminate

As mentioned earlier, there is more to these pests that meets the naked eye. They are so sturdy, extremely persistent, and tolerant to any constantly changing environment, that surviving for extended periods (a year or perhaps more) without feeding on a blood source can seemingly be a walk on the park for these arthropods. Taking their small size more likely as an advantage rather than a crippling weakness, bedbugs can easily hide in cracks and crevices and rarely come out from their hideouts in daylight. This entails utmost difficulty for those attempting to seek and exterminate these insects.

Bedbugs are wingless, so they cannot fly nor jump like fleas. However, they can move at astonishing speed and can crawl on floors, carpets, mattress seams, sheets, and furniture with ease. Furthermore, female bedbugs can lay up to 5 to 7 eggs (or more) per week (or 200–500 eggs in her life if fed).[2] These eggs hatch in a short span of time, probably about ten days. This enables these insects to create a massive strong army of brown “bed criminals” in a very short time.

A strong chemcial insecticide is typically used by professionals to eliminate and control bedbugs, but there are several other effective ways to get the task done without the use of insecticides or any poisonous method. In addition, the use of pesticides can be very problematic: First, these intense chemicals may pose possible health risks for both people and pets, including cancer and acute neurotoxicity. Second, using pesticides repeatedly against bedbugs may produce pesticide resistance and dispersal of these insects.[4]

17 Natural Ways To Get Rid Of Bedbugs

Here are some of the natural means to get rid of bedbugs (in no particular order of preference).  It is often suggested to do as much as possible to be rid of them as they can be very hard to get rid of.

1. Physical Removal.

Isolating bedbugs, along with preventing these brown bugs from spreading further, is one good step to start with. Cracks and crevices of bed frames should be examined, especially if the frame is wood. It also pays well to inspect cracks and corners of dressers; seams, tufts, skirts, and crevices beneath cushions of upholstered chairs and sofas; cracks in wood molding; ceiling-wall junctures; and behind picture frames, switch plates, and outlets.[2]

Bedbugs can (and should) be forced to get out from their hideouts. This can be done by using either a putty knife or a playing card. Once bedbugs have been forced out of their dwelling place such as cracks and crevices, one can catch them with a sticky packing tape or crush them in paper towels.

2. Diatomaceous earth. The powder of diatomaceous earth, a kind of soft sedimentary rock, can be used in a dry environment to control bedbugs. The dust-like powder of this rock can stay on the bedbugs’ outer layer of exoskeleton. This disrupts the layer and dehydrates the insects. Also, upon walking on diatomaceous earth, the bedbugs carry the diatomaceous earth along with them through their legs and they lick it off. The sharp silica damages their insides and kills them.

3. Kidney bean leaves. In Eastern Europe, kidney bean leaves are spread on the floor of a bedbug-infested room to “trap” bedbugs. The leaves are destroyed then after. The mechanism behind this practice can be attributed to the microscopic hooked hairs (i.e., trichomes) on the bean leaf surfaces that impale the feet of bedbugs. When impaled by the trichomes, the bedbugs are unable to free themselves despite their struggle.[5]

4. Pyrethrum. Pyrethrum is a natural insecticide (extract) that can be obtained from the dried flower heads of plants Chrysanthemum cinerariifolium and C. coccineum. These perennial plants are themselves called “pyrethrum” and have daisy-like flowers. The refined form of the “pyrethrum extract” is pyrethrin. Pyrethrin attacks the nervous systems of bedbugs and is thus toxic to them.[6]

5. A fungus called Beauveria bassianaBeauveria bassiana is a fungus that can act as a parasite to insects, thus killing or at least disabling them. Because of such, this fungus is considered a “natural insecticide.” It grows in soil and is environmentally safe to use for bedbug control. A 2012 US study from the Department of Entomology, Pennsylvania State University, had determined that B. bassiana is virulent against bedbugs and causes the death of these insects at 3–5 days following short-term exposure to spray residues.[7]This fungus has also some “pre-lethal” effects such as reduced feeding, mobility, and fecundity.

6. Essential oils. Essential oils like tea tree oil, manuka oil, or oregano oil appear to be effective in alleviating itching and swelling from bedbug bites. As bedbug killers, they are effective too. Essential oils “suffocate” the insects by blocking their spiracles (the external openings of the bedbugs’ respiratory system). Tea tree oil in particular can be combined with water into a spray bottle. Then, the mixture is used to lightly mist one’s furniture, sheets, pillows, or any areas where bedbugs have been spotted. Cedar oil and orange oil are natural remedies to eradicate bedbugs. These oils only work however upon contact on the insects (i.e., contact kill).

7. Heat treatment. Applying heat from blow dryers kills bedbugs after 30 seconds of continuous contact. Where blow dryers or washers are unsuitable for some items, these items can be “de-infested” by enclosing them in a plastic and keeping them outdoors in a hot, sunny area where the sun’s heat can toast the bugs. Try also airing the beds, mattresses, or moveable furniture out in the bright sunlight. Expose surfaces and hidden areas to the heat emitted by the sun to kill also the eggs. Sustained steam treatment can also eliminate bedbugs at all stages, but this method can sometimes be ineffective since the bugs are good hiders – and may not be suitable for all furnishings.

8. Cold treatment. Cold treatment is as cheap as heat treatment. Both heat and cold treatments are effective against bedbugs because these insects are susceptible to temperature extremes and require a stable temperature without airflow. A simple means to control bedbugs using cold treatment is just to situate a few desktop fans on the floor around the infested bed or area and to let airflow circulate continuously in the area for at least 3–4 hours daily. Alternatively, an air conditioner can be turned on to cool and dry the air.

9. Double Sided Tape.  One of the more unusual tactics used against bedbugs is the use of double sided tape to create “bug free zones” – as they cannot cross the sticky barrier! Some ideas seen are to put the tape on the legs of beds and even around the edge of mattresses.

10. Clean and disinfect. Although bedbugs are not indicators of poor sanitation, eliminating all the clutter to minimize the possible places where they can hide can be a very good idea. If possible, all items suspected of having bedbugs should be washed in very hot water (140 °F) and dried for at least 20 min. When laundering is not efficient or possible, items such as bedding, toys, shoes, and clothing can be placed in a clothes dryer set at high heat (so long as this will not damage the clothing of course) for 10 to 20 min to kill bedbugs.

11. Vacuuming. Carpets, floors, furniture, any crack or crevice, bed frames, or any place that appears to be a bedbug hideout should be vacuumed – even as often as every day. One of the things that make bedbugs detestable is that they and their eggs can be very hard to dislodge, so be certain that the end of the suction wand should be moved and scraped along infested places. Note that the vacuum contents should be disposed of in a sealed trash bag or the vacuum or seal should be emptied outside the house.

12. Sealing cracks and crevices. One technique to get rid of a pest is to destroy its hiding place. Apply caulk to seal crevices and joints in baseboards and gaps on shelving or cabinets, and repair cracks in plaster. Tighten and fill the cracks in the house.

13. Disposal of infested furnishings. Most of the time, items or furnishings need not be thrown away. Discarding items such as a mattress or a couch is of course costly. However, heavy bedbug infestation necessitates so, especially if the item is with bugs and eggs in already hard-to-reach areas and the item is in poor condition.

14. Scented dyer sheets. The scent from scented dryer sheets is reported to have a repelling effect against bedbugs. Spread scented dryer sheets over sofas and mattresses. Have around eight to ten scented dryer sheets between box springs and mattress, and put the same amount of dryer sheets on the surface of the mattress.

15. Cleaning agents, bleach, and lavender. As mentioned earlier, diatomaceous earth is abrasive in nature against bedbugs. Certain cleaning agents contain diatomaceous earth and can kill bedbugs by dehydrating these insects. The regular use of strong bleaching agents to clean the floors and walls can work too. Lavender sachets have become popular nowadays; lavender scent repels bedbugs and thus keeps them away.

16. Alcohol. The use of sprayed alcohol on walls, floors, mattress, and furniture can be effective against bedbugs. It kills bedbugs upon contact and dehydrates the eggs. Remember that alcohol can stain and damage wood surfaces finished with lacquer or varnish such as in furniture. Because of this, it is advisable to test first a small portion of the furniture to evaluate if alcohol reacts to it unfavorably.

17. Sealing Mattress In Plastic Cover.  A properly sealed mattress cover will prevent the little monsters from getting in or out – and this can be a very useful strategy.

If home remedies are not sufficient for getting rid of bedbugs, professional pest control is of course advised – but this will almost certainly involve chemical treatments.

Do you have any other tips on bedbug removal, or experiences to share? Please let us know in the comments!

References

[1] Potter M. F. (2010). Bed bugs. University of Kentucky College of Agriculture. Retrieved 3 July 2013 fromhttp://www2.ca.uky.edu/entomology/entfacts/ef636.asp

[2] Preventing and getting rid of bed bugs safely: A guide for property owners, managers and tenants. Retrieved 3 July 2013 from http://www.nyc.gov/html/doh/downloads/pdf/vector/bed-bug-guide.pdf

[3] Bed bug. Wikipedia. Retrieved 3 July 2013 from http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bed_bug

[4] Bed bug control techniques. Wikipedia. Retrieved 3 July 2013 fromhttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bed_bug_control_techniques

[5] Szyndler M. W., Haynes K. F., Potter M. F., Corn R. M., & Loudon C. (2013). Entrapment of bed bugs by leaf trichomes inspires microfabrication of biomimetic surfaces. Journal of the Royal Society Interface, 10(83). doi: 10.1098/rsif.2013.0174. Retrieved 3 July 2013 fromhttp://rsif.royalsocietypublishing.org/content/10/83/20130174

[6] Pyrethrum. WebMD. Retrieved 3 July 2013 from http://www.webmd.com/vitamins-supplements/ingredientmono-387-PYRETHRUM.aspx?activeIngredientId=387&activeIngredientName=PYRETHRUM

[7] Barbarin A. M., Jenkins N. E., Rajotte E. G., & Thomas M. B. (2012). A preliminary evaluation of the potential of Beauveria bassiana for bed bug control. Journal of Invertebrate Pathology, 111(1): 82–85. doi: 10.1016/j.jip.2012.04.009. Retrieved 3 July 2013 from http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22555012

Article by Dan Ablir for herbs-info.com © 2013


Diatomaceous Earth

What Exactly is Diatomaceous Earth?

In SA, available from http://www.biosil.co.za

What can diatomaceous earth do for your body, home, and homestead? Find out more.

Diatomaceous earth technically comes from the cell walls of fossilized single-cell diatoms – essentially, it’s a fossil, ground into a very fine powder. There are two general types of diatomaceous earth: food grade and industrial grade. While industrial grade is toxic to humans and pets, food grade diatomaceous earth is non-toxic and very beneficial on multiple levels, and is the type I’ll be discussing with you here today.

Diatomaceous earth exhibits some interesting properties:

  • When viewed through a microscope, it looks like a hollow cylinder, with holes throughout the side.
  • It carries a strong negative charge. If you’ll recall your science lessons, you’ll remember that negatively charged ions are attracted to positively charged ions.
  • Therefore, when taken internally, the diatomaceous earth attracts and absorbs positively-charged pathogens into its cylinder – it absorbs the things we want to stay away from, likeviruses, pathogenic fungi and bacteria, heavy metals, prescription drug residues, pesticides, parasites, radiation, and the like – and sweeps them out of our bodies.
  • Diatomaceous earth is also very hard. On a scale of “hardness”, if diamonds were a 9, diatomaceous earth would be a 7. This helps us too – as this powder makes its way through our digestive tract, it gently “scrubs” the packed-on residue we have there and sweeps it out of our bodies. Nice, diatoms!
  • Also, because of this quality, it is very sharp. Organisms such as parasites, lurking in our intestines, are sliced up and killed, and swept away when we empty our bowels, and weare left unharmed.
  • The last quality I’ll mention is also powerful: food grade diatomaceous earth is 84% silica, and contains some 20 trace minerals. Did you know life can’t exist without silica? It is essential for the building of healthy bones and teeth, skin, hair, and nails. As our mineral resources are getting depleted, our food is containing less and less silica. Do yourself a favor and add this divine diatom to your diet.

How Do I Take Diatomaceous Earth?

(Some of the following links are affiliate links)

I’ll start with a public service announcement: YOU MUST ONLY BUY AND USE FOOD GRADE DIATOMACEOUS EARTH. Sorry to yell, but the distinction is very important. Fortunately, it is easily found both locally and online.

Where to buy food grade diatomaceous earth.

Now that I’ve made that clear, I’ll give the instructions: to take diatomaceous earth, all you have to do is mix a spoonful into some water or other liquid, and drink. Follow with another cup of water. (Diatomaceous earth can make you thirsty – make sure and drink plenty of water while using this supplement.) It’s that easy! You can also add it to smoothies – it’s totally undetected that way.

Dosage: If you are just beginning your diatomaceous earth journey, start with a teaspoon mixed in liquid, as I’ve detailed above, once a day. Slowly increase to twice a day, and then slowly increase the amount taken, up to a heaping tablespoon, and up to three times a day.

Please hear me: slowly. Diatomaceous earth is a way to detox your body, and if you start with too much, your body will get rid of toxins too quickly and leave you feeling under the weather. Yes, it really does work that well! If you start experiencing light headaches, you’ll know you took it a little fast. But don’t stop altogether, just do yourself a favor and take it slowly – no need to rush.

Pregnant and nursing mamas, you’re in the clear – diatomaceous earth can be safely taken during either stage. Just be sure to drink plenty of water. It is also fine for children to take in smaller doses. My children get their DE in their smoothies.

How does it taste? Well, if you want to know the truth, you’ll feel like you just licked a mud puddle. Ha! Not that you’ve ever done that, but it just tastes… like dirt. Sometimes it is hard for me to get down, but I am so motivated by the positive changes it’s brought to my body!

My favorite detox drink is diatomaceous earth mixed with coconut water and honey.

What Can Diatomaceous Earth Do for Your Body?

  • Since it sweeps out foreign matter, you will begin to notice better nutrient absorption and less fatigue.
  • Studies show that DE can help your body lower cholesterol and high blood pressure. Believe it or not, some users report a 40-60 point drop in blood pressure points after only a month of use.
  • The beauty mineral: the silica in DE helps hair and nails grow faster. Since I’ve started taking it, my nails have turned from flimsy to hard as a rock. My hair, which partially fell out earlier this year due to a difficult surgery recovery, has begun filling in nicely. I have read many, many testimonies of people who have reported that it reversed their baldness. The silica also helps reduce wrinkles, age spots, and acne, and it also strengthens teeth and bones, tendons, and joints.
  • Metal detoxification: since DE sweeps heavy metals out of the body, this is helpful especially to those with heavy metal poisoning or mercury fillings, which leach mercury constantly into the body. Aluminum is also swept out, lowering the risk for Alzheimer’s disease.
  • Helps repair and maintain lung function, acts as a cough decreasing agent
  • Helps prevent kidney stones, osteoporosis,
  • Decreases vertigo, tinnitus, and insomnia
  • Regulates bowel movements, lessens gastrointestinal inflammation, cleans out the colon, treats both diarrhea and constipation. It is a great choice for families on the GAPS diet!
  • Treats head lice and fleas (make sure you don’t inhale the powder)

Diatomaceous Earth for Furry Friends

It’s true – your pets and livestock will reap the benefits as well.

  • Sprinkle a little DE on your pets’ food daily for the same benefits you receive. This is a great de-wormer!
  • Carefully sprinkle onto your pets’ and livestock’s coats – making sure none is inhaled – for protection from lice, ticks and fleas.
  • Sprinkle in the kitty litter box and pet beds for extra odor and flea protection.
  • Sprinkle in your barn, stalls, nesting areas, and coops for pest protection.
  • Decreased mastitis and increased milk production in livestock with internal use. Causes healthier coat and hooves.
  • Better and stronger eggs produced by hens who have it sprinkled in their feed.
  • For dosage instructions and more benefits, visit this page.

Diatomaceous Earth for the Home and Homestead

You can use DE around your home in the following ways:

  • Sprinkle around windows and entrances to protect from ants, spiders, and even scorpions. (The DE scrapes their exoskeleton and dries it out, leaving them dead.)
  • Sprinkle a ring around your garden plants for protection from garden pests. (Do realize, though, that DE kills beneficial insects as well. Avoid applying onto flowers. – Does not harm worms or beneficial soil microorganisms.
  • DE will destroy ant colonies, even fire ant colonies. Sprinkle around and in the hole.
  • DE can be used to treat a bedbug infestation.
  • Sprinkle DE in your garbage bins for odor and pest protection.
  • Got a compost heap? Apply DE to keep odors and pests away.
  • Add to manure heaps to keep flies and larvae down.
  • Add to bulk grains to keep pests and moisture out.
  • You can use DE to make your own homemade toothpaste! I have a recipe coming to my blog soon.
  • You can add DE to your homemade “DE”odorant – I am also working on a recipe for this.
  • You can sprinkle DE in your toilet for a little extra scrubbing power – it won’t harm porcelain.

FYI: if the area where you applied the DE gets wet, such as in the garden, please reapply.

As you can see, there are so many uses! I hope I’ve intrigued you today about my friend, diatomaceous earth. I believe no family, home, or homestead should be without it. It’s worth a shot, don’t you think?

What can diatomaceous earth do for your body, home, and homestead? Find out more.

Danielle is first and foremost a daughter of the Most High God. She is married to her best friend, and they have four children. She is a recovering procrastinator, a real foodie, and an unapologetic dreamer. And yes, she eats dirt daily. You can find Danielle blogging about life, love, simplicity, and her affinity for bacon at http://lovelovething.com– Don’t forget to join the discussion on Facebook too.

References:

  1. http://diatomaceousearthsource.org/
  2. http://www.earthworkshealth.com/How-Diatomaceous-Earth-Works.php
  3. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Diatomaceous_earth
  4. http://www.naturalnews.com/039326_diatomaceous_earth_detox_mercury.html
  5. http://www.naturalnews.com/033367_silica_diatomaceous_earth.html

Source : http://www.theprairiehomestead.com/2014/01/diatomaceous-earth-homestead.html

 


Diatomaceous Earth benefits

Diatomaceous Earth 

Human Use


Food Grade Diatomaceous Earth 
Health Benefits
On this page, we have categorized some of the results from testimonial reports that we have reviewed regarding Food Grade Diatomaceous Earth human health benefits, and wherever possible between this page and our “How DE Works” page, we try to reflect the science behind the testimonials. Of course, most actual in depth health related studies are initiated and controlled by the pharmaceutical industry, and why should those companies study the value of health remedies found in nature that could actually hurt their bottom line?  
So here, we will endeavor to discuss the results that DE users have experienced by taking a heaping tablespoon of DE in their favorite juice or liquid on a daily basis without the benefit of an industry sponsored study. For more background on how Diatomaceous Earth works within the human body to create the benefits related on this page, see How DE Works. Some people react with great skepticism regarding human consumption of DE, and while it is not allowed by government regulators for distributers to make claims about DE’s use as a human health supplement, we do hope to help illuminate the logical reasoning behind the health claims of CONSUMERS regarding the use of Food Grade Diatomaceous Earth for human health.
My name is Larry Smith, (President of Earthworks Health, LLC and EarthworksHealth.com). For better health, people like me and my family take one or two tablespoons of Diatomaceous Earth in a liquid every day. Many people benefit from just one teaspoon daily!  I mix it with grapefruit juice and my wife mixes it with just water. Other options are mixing the DE with soda pop, juice, or whatever liquid you prefer. Some mix DE in protein shakes, applesauce or yogurt. Our Food Grade Diatomaceous Earth is pure. There is no actual flavor or taste to it. Since DE does not dissolve, stirring the mixture several times as you drink it will prevent settling. Some folks experience higher energy levels, so it is probably best not to take just before sleeping. Not to worry about taking too much -  any excess silica not needed by the body is naturally eliminated through the kidneys and intestines… but we must find our own comfortable levels.

Remarkable Diatomaceous Earth health benefits through Silica 

As previously noted, like most wonderful natural products, this product requires an FDA Disclaimer: “This information is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease. Discussion of Diatomaceous Earth health benefits is based solely on personal experience and testimony shared by individual DE users and this company cannot market or label DE as a human health supplement with specific medical claims.” Having said that, we look at what consumers say about DE and at evidence of DE’s important cleansing properties and value as a rich source of Silica.

Diatomaceous Earth (DE) has been reported to absorb methyl mercury, E. coli, endotoxins, viruses (including poliovirus), organophosphate pesticide residues, and drug residues. DE is a natural organic colon cleanser and detoxifier. This cleansing and detoxification alone has a myriad of positive effects in the human body. Mechanisms are cited on “How DE Works” page. Adding to this is the widespread deficiency in human dietary sources of what is called “the most important trace element in human health” – Silica, and how rich DE is in this substance, we begin to understand the basis of the health benefits that so many have attested to. Only a trace amount of the DE silica is absorbed into the blood stream, and just that amount is a substantial gain for the user.

A growing number of people count beneficial human side effects of Diatomaceous Earth and SILICA as being nothing short of vital to their well being and exhibit genuine devotion toward its use. The only cautionary side effect that we have found relating to Food Grade DE has to do with direct inhalation and is essentially the same caution that is advised when handling baby powder. DE is a very fine powder.

Food Grade Diatomaceous Earth is 89% Silica.

It was established in the 1940s that life can’t exist without Silica. More recently, in her book “Water & Salt” Dr. Barbara Hendel states: “Silica is the most important trace element in human health.”Silica plays an important role in many bodily functions and has a direct relationship to mineral absorption.

The average human body holds approximately seven grams of silica, needing significantly more silica than even important minerals such as iron. Most people are, in fact, silica deficient. Among other things, enough silica in the body is vital enough for calcium absorption to allow calcium supplements to work. If Silica deficient, as is the case in the vast majority of us, calcium supplementation can even be a negative. Food Grade Diatomaceous Earth is an excellent natural and organic source of silica.

Other Reported Health Benefits of Silica / DE Include 
Blood Pressure, Cholesterol, Osteoperosis, Weight Loss, Cosmetics, Hair, Nails, Teeth & Gums, Energy, Bacteria, Mucus, Anti-Aging, Urinary Infections, Headache.Here’s what consumers have to say about Diatomaceous Earth:

Lower High Blood Pressure
Of the thousands of people that are using Diatomaceous Earth, most that have high blood pressure have reported that it has gone down.  It has been so thrilling to talk to people all over the United States and have them tell their stories. We are not just talking a few points – we are talking about LIFE-CHANGING numbers.  Doctors are amazed–customers are amazed. You will be, too.

Lower High Cholesterol
According to consumers, just as Diatomaceous Earth health benefits include lowering blood pressure, it has also been lowering cholesterol!  I have not talked with one person that has high cholesterol that has not had lower numbers after taking Diatomaceous Earth.  Most are reporting 40-60 points lower after only 2 weeks on DE.  I know it sounds too good to be true, but it works!

Just received this feedback from a user..
“I have been on DE for 6 months now and I just had my lab work done. My triglycerides have been reduced from 495 down to 203. I have so much more energy and my hair and nails are growing so much better. My husband has had high blood pressure and since being on the dirt, his BP is now in the normal range. It has also helped with my varicose veins and I no longer have any pain from them..”
.. Rhonda from Louisiana

Osteoporosis, Joints & Calcium
Osteoporosis is a symptom of the aging process. As calcium in our body system depletes, our bones become brittle and weak. Taking only a calcium supplement cannot correct or stop this threatening and crippling disease because the body cannot assimilate and make use of the calcium without the presence of silica. Evidence suggests that, instead of affecting healing, supplemental mineral calcium, on the contrary, accelerates the leaching away of bone calcium and thus hastens the degenerative process of osteoporosis and similar diseases that affect the supportive and connective tissues in the human body. The Silica found in Diatomaceous Earth enhances calcium absorbtion.

For Osteoporosis
Silica can stop the pain and even restore the body’s self repair process. Osteoporosis symptoms attack women primarily after menopause but the degenerative process starts much earlier in their younger days. More women are dying of fractures caused by osteoporosis than of cancer of the breast, cervix, and uterus combined. Silica is responsible for the depositing of minerals into the bones, especially calcium. It speeds up the healing of fractures and also reduces scarring at the site of a fracture. More and more research evidence shows that through a transmutation process, silica is turned into calcium when it is needed. That is why some scientists refer to silica as a precursor of calcium. Even when calcium is insufficient, the body can turn silica into calcium that the bones need.

Natural Weight Loss
We have been getting hundreds of reports from all over the United States that DE is helping people lose weight.  Everyone is saying that DE taken in the morning helps curb their appetite throughout the day.  Just one more reason to take it everyday!

Detox Your Body
Diatomaceous Earth health benefits reported to inlude detox! According to Kaayla T. Daniel, PhD, CCN and Galen D. Knight, PhD in their article “Mad as a Hatter” there is no better product to detox HEAVY METALS and RADIATION from your body than with Food Grade Diatomaceous Earth!

Nature’s Internal Cosmetic
In Europe and Asia, Diatomaceous Earth health benefits are widely recognized to include use as a health and beauty product for hair, skin, nails, bones, and joints.

Tissue Degeneration
Accelerates due to aging when connective tissue develops an increasing inability to retain moisture when left unassisted. Silica can help slow the degenerative process of connective tissue. With silica, vitality and life, which are often lost as the years accumulate, can be naturally maintained or even restored to your skin. Collagen, largely made up of silica, is the glue that holds us together. If our body has enough silica glucosaminoglycane, the collagen will make us look younger. Silica helps with skin problems and injuries including itching, rashes, abscesses, boils, acne, callouses, warts, eczemas, burns, frostbite, benign skin sores, insect bites and bed sores. If you regularly follow a silica regimen, your skin will keep its youthful look. A good silica supplementation program works far better than other products for maintaining healthier and longer lasting collagen.

Hair That Grows
Hair is nature’s greatest beauty enhancer. Hair deserves to be pampered. Hair at 90 micrograms per gram is almost as rich in silica as are healthy bones, which contain 100 micrograms per gram. Silica is a major component of hair. Using a good silica supplement should be part of your ongoing hair care program for revitalizing hair. Silica helps to prevent baldness, stimulates healthier hair growth and assures beautiful shine, luster and strength.

Teeth and Gums
By hardening the enamel, silica prevents cavities and preserves teeth. Silica also prevents bleeding gums, gum atrophy, and recession that causes the loosening of teeth, which could ultimately lead to tooth loss. Silica effectively fights ulceration and the decay of bones and teeth and also lessens inflammation.

Tough As Nails
Your nail plates are complex protein structures that grow four to five millimeters per month on average. With silica supplementation, fragile nails become normal within a short period of time. Silica will beautify the appearance of your nails and improve their hardness, making them shinier and less prone to breaking.

Restorative Effects Of Silica 
This will be most noticeable on your hair, skin, nails and teeth. Our skin and hair require silica essentially for the same purpose as do other tissues. As we know, the supporting collagen underneath the skin enhances elasticity and beauty. Collagen owes that quality to silica, which provides a beautiful complexion that is more than skin deep.

Pubic Lice (Crabs) and Hair Lice
Dust Diatomaceous Earth on all areas of the body that are infested with the Lice (Crabs). Also dust your bedding and rooms you have been in. 

More Reported Benefits Of Diatomaceous Earth:

  • Silica lowers bad cholesterol and raises good
  • Silica fades age spots
  • Silica stimulates metabolism for higher energy levels
  • Diatomaceous Earth has a negative charge and bacteria has a positive charge. It is believed that Diatomaceous Earth sweeps bacteria out of the body by trapping it in its honeycomb shaped skeletal form.
  • Silica supplementation helps repair and maintain vital lung tissue and protects them from pollution. By maintaining or restoring the elasticity of lung tissue, silica reduces inflammation in bronchitis.
  • It acts as a cough decreasing agent. Silica tones the upper respiratory tract (nose, pharynx, larynx) and reduces swelling because of its positive action on the lymphatic system.
  • Silica supplementation keeps menopause free of stress and helps to prevent many unwanted side effects of menopause
  • Silica works with other antioxidants to prevent premature aging and to preserve youthfulness.
  • Silica can help prevent kidney stones and heal infections of the urinary tract. It is a natural diuretic which can increase excretion of urine by 30 percent, thus flushing the water-excreting system and restoring normal function to these vital organs.
  • The presence of sufficient silica in the intestines will reduce inflammation of the intestinal tract. It can cause disinfection in the case of stomach and intestinal mucus and ulcers. Silica can prevent or clear up diarrhea and its opposite, constipation.
  • Silica will help normalize hemorrhoidal tissues.
  • In regulating and normalizing the bowels, silica has a pleasant side effect; it can alleviate lower back pain, which often troubles the elderly.
  • Silica proves effective with female discharge, abscesses and ulcers in the genital area and cervix, as well as mastitis (especially for breast feeding mothers).
  • The intake of silica acts as a supportive treatment for inflammation of the middle ear. Because of the beneficial effectiveness on the lymphatic system, silica can be used for swelling of the lymph nodes in the throat.
  • Has anti-inflammatory disinfecting, absorbing and odor binding effects.
  • Silica can normalize circulation and regulate high blood pressure (hypertension).
  • Silica can decrease vertigo, headache, tinnitus (buzzing of the ears) and insomnia.
  • Silica can help diabetes by promoting synthesis of elastase inhibitor by the pancreas.
  • Silica can help arterial disease by strengthening the blood vessels. Studies confirm that with age, silica disappears from the aorta, the heart’s key blood vessel, thus weakening its critical connective tissue and resulting in a greater cardiac risk.
  • Silica can help prevent Tuberculosis.
  • By improving the elasticity of the joints, silica helps rheumatism.
  • Silica has inhibitory effects on coronary diseases.
  • Silica can help avoiding or alleviating Alzheimer’s disease by preventing the body from absorbing aluminum and may flush out aluminum from the tissues. Silica can stimulate the immune system.

USAGE:
 Most who use Diatomaceous Earth mixed with a juice or liquid say that they use one to two tablespoons daily.  

Diatomaceous Earth FAQ:
http://www.earthworkshealth.com/Diatomaceous-Earth-FAQ.php

See Home Page For Diatomaceous Earth Video

Don’t forget that Diatomaceous Earth has many Household Uses.

REQUIRED FDA DISCLAIMER: *
Content on this site is for reference purposes only, based on reviews from users of diatomaceous earth. It is not intended to substitute for advice given by a physician, pharmacist, or other licensed healthcare professional. User statements regarding this dietary supplement have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration and are not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease or health condition. Those with health problems, pregnancy or who are nursing are specifically advised that they should consult their physician before taking any nutritional supplement.

* Any food grade diatomaceous earth uses other than those approved by the EPA, FDA, or USDA are strictly anecdotal reports of what countless numbers of users as well as we ourselves have done with diatomaceous earth.

Source: http://www.earthworkshealth.com/human-use.php

Other interesting links :

http://wolfcreekranch1.tripod.com/diatomaceous_human_use.html

http://www.ibreatheimhungry.com/2013/02/foodless-friday-health-benefits-of-diatomaceous-earth.html

…………………………………………………….

Diatomaceous Earth – Household Uses

See Home Page For Diatomaceous Earth Video

Enjoy the many practical and money saving benefits of

Diatomaceous Earth for every day household use:

Metal Cleaner:

Make a paste with Diatomaceous Earth and water to make a metal polish. Diatomaceous Earth also makes a very inexpensive soft scrub for the shower, sink and faucets.

Face Mask and Cleanser:

Mix Diatomaceous Earth and water together until you have made a paste. Apply to the face with circular scrubbing motion until face is fully covered. Leave on face for approx. 2 min. and then wash off with warm water. Your face will be fully exfoliated and toned for pennies!! Mix Diatomaceous Earth with your favorite cleanser and you will have cleaner, smoother skin.

Teeth Cleaner:

Sprinkle a small amount on your favorite brand of toothpaste and brush as you normally would. You will notice that your teeth look and feel “Just went to the dentist” clean.

Household Pests:

Use Diatomaceous Earth for control of roaches, silverfish, ants, bedbugs, flies, fleas, box elder bugs, scorpions, crickets, and many other insects. Diatomaceous Earth can be used in and around the home, yard, animal housing, etc. Diatomaceous Earth will not harm earthworms or beneficial soil microorganisms. *

Garage/Driveway Oil Stains:

To remove oil stains from garage floor or driveway: Make sure area is dry and completely cover the stain with diatomaceous earth. Let the powder soak up the oil for 24 hours. Remove the excess with a metal spatula or paint scraper and dispose.

Refrigerator/Freezer Odors:

Diatomaceous Earth can be used in the same way as baking soda to banish odors. Leave an open box or jar of DE in the refrigerator and freezer. Replace with fresh DE every week or so.

Foot Odor:

For fresh smelling footware, place some DE into the ends of two knee high nylon stockings and tie a knot the top. Place the stockings inside shoes or boots. Leave until used again.

Carpet Stains:

To remove stains from carpets, cover the stain with DE and lightly work into the stain. Let set for at least 2 hours and vacuum up.

Garbage Can Odor:

To deodorize a garbage can with DE, sprinkle a cup or so of diatomaceous earth in the bottom of the garbage can. Not only deodorizes, but will kill any bugs and larvae that are present.

Diatomaceous Earth FAQ:
http://www.earthworkshealth.com/Diatomaceous-Earth-FAQ.php


Lemon Tree tra la la la la la …..

How to grow an organic

lemon tree from seed

When life gives you lemons, grow trees!

If you’ve ever seen a flowering lemon tree, you’ll understand why. For those of you who haven’t, allow me explain. Their lush, dark green, oval leaves have a glossy texture that shimmers in sunlight. Their delicate white flowers bloom with a citrus fragrance and are soft to the touch. Their exotic nature provides an alluring quality. And, finally, they bear the exciting possibility of fruit!

Typically, lemon trees flourish outdoors year-round in hot, sunny regions, but they can also thrive indoors as edible houseplants in cold-season climates. At the organic food store where I work we have a healthy lemon cutting producing massive fruit in a garage setting all year. It makes for an impressive sight during the dead of a Canadian winter!

This is the little tree with big fruit in the shop I work at.

And while rooting cuttings is a sensible option for fast fruit, lemon tree cuttings are not readily available in many parts of the world. But lemons are another story. And although it may take anywhere from 3-6 years for your tree to be capable of producing fruit, there is something extra rewarding about starting from seed. I currently have six strong little seedlings on the go, all of which were germinated in the middle of winter with very little effort. Watching them grow has been an exciting and fascinating experience and I know the best is yet to come.

Here is a step-by-step guide to growing your very own lemon tree from seed:

Things you’ll need:

1. A lemon. Make sure you purchase an organic lemon since some non-organic lemon seeds may be “duds”, incapable of germinating. Any organic lemon will do, but if you have climate or space restrictions, you may want to try looking for a specific variety called a “Meyer” lemon. Meyer lemons are a smaller type of lemon, often grown for ornamental purposes, and are thus better suited for indoor containers. I chose Meyer seeds for these reasons, but you can use any seed that makes sense for your situation.

This is a Meyer lemon!

2. Potting soil. I would guess that any potting soil will do, but I suggest using one with a blend of peat, perlite, vermiculite, and organic fertilizer. Every single one of the seeds I planted in this type of certified organic potting mix have sprouted beautifully, so I think it’s fair to say that it works.

3. Container/pot. A container (with drainage holes) that is 5-6” deep and a few inches in diameter will be sufficient for sprouting; however, the seedling will need to be re-potted into a much larger container. Mature lemon trees prefer a container that is wider rather than deeper, so I suggest planting your seedling in a pot that is 10-16” deep and 12-18” in diameter. Your baby tree will happily make itself at home in this larger container for the next few years, at which time you may want to upgrade again.

4. A grow light or lots of sun. Lemon trees need a lot of light, especially when they are sprouting and require 10-14 hours of it each day. If you don’t have a consistently sunny window (like me), get a grow light. They don’t cost much and will prove their worth in healthy green foliage.

Method for sprouting the lemon seed:

1. Pre-moisten your potting soil. Put some soil into a bucket and mix in some water until the soil is damp all the way through.

2. Fill your container with the pre-moistened soil. Leave about an inch of space below the rim of your container.

3. Slice open your lemon and choose a seed that looks completely full of life. Pop it into your mouth and suck on it until all the flesh is removed and the lemon flavour is gone. Do not allow the seed to dry out at any time. It needs to stay moist in order to germinate. I suggest keeping it in your mouth until you’re ready to plant.

4. Plant your seed! While it’s moist, plant your seed about 1/2″ below the soil level. Cover it completely with soil and water well with a squirt bottle or gentle watering can.

5. Cover your container with breathable plastic to keep your seeds warm and moist. I used a piece of clear garbage bag with holes poked into it and a rubber band to securely hold it in place.

6. Place the container in a warm location and observe for the next few days. Keep in mind: your seed needs warmth and moisture in order to germinate. Don’t allow the potting soil to dry out completely. Also take caution that you don’t cook your seed in its little greenhouse. Too much heat and moisture could lead to a rotten seed! You’re aiming to achieve a nice balance, so if you feel like the soil is warm enough without the plastic then it’s probably safest to remove it.

7. In about two weeks you may notice a sprout emerging from the soil. Once it appears, remove the plastic (if it’s still on) and place the little guy in a warm location with plenty of direct sunlight. Supplement sun with your grow light if needed.

Here are my little guys one month after planting.

At a little less than two months old, this little guy is upgrading to a larger home.

8. Care for your new baby and watch it grow! Provide it with:

  • Water. Ensure that the soil is damp at all times, especially when your lemon tree is young. Do not allow it to sit in a puddle of stagnant water though; those drainage holes are there for good reason.
  • Sunlight. Place it in a warm sunny window where it will receive eight hours of direct sunlight each day, or supplement some sun for a grow light. Since Toronto rarely seems to get any sun in the winter, my sprouts reside in a well-lit window under the warm rays of a grow light for 12 hours each day.
  • Food. In order to keep your lemon tree healthy and growing the soil will eventually need to be replenished with nutrients. I suggest feeding it an organic fertilizer, such as compost or vermicompost, once it has developed a nice little set of leaves. Dig a little trench around the base of your tree, fill it with compost and water it well. Or, serve it up as compost tea. Try feeding it twice a year or as needed, but do not overfeed! When it comes to fertilizing, less it best; so if in doubt, put it off a bit longer. (Another option is to start your seed in potting soil with vermicompost or worm castings mixed into it).
  • Love. Spend some time looking at your new citrus friend. Pay attention to its growth. Feel it, talk to it, sing to it, but don’t try to dance with it. Get into the habit of watching for browning leaves and checking the underside of leaves for pests. Just like us, our plants can fall victim to bugs and disease and may sometimes require some extra love and affection.

Source: http://growingwildceeds.wordpress.com/2012/03/10/how-to-grow-a-lemon-tree-from-seed/

 


Roach ridders

How To Naturally Keep Roaches Away

How To Naturally Keep Roaches Away

It is no mystery that humans generally do not like bugs. However, there are some bugs that just rank a little higher on our “nasty scale” than others. Most folks would agree that cockroaches would definitely be on our list of bugs we hate. People have a general idea that cockroaches are gross, but do you know specifically how they are a danger to your health?

Essential Oils

Many bugs find the scent of essential oils repellant. Roaches are no exception. You can create your own homemade roach spray using completely non-toxic essential oils. The most effective oils at repelling roaches are cypress oil and peppermint oil. To make a non-toxic roach spray, mix 8 drops of cypress oil and 10 drops of peppermint oil to half a cup of water. Spray the mixture anywhere you have roach issues. The added benefit is that these oils smell lovely. No gas masks required.

Asthma and Allergies

Surprisingly, the biggest threat posed by roaches is their effect on our breathing. A majority of people are allergic to roaches to some degree. When there are a large number of roaches present in a home, roach by products, if you will, such as eggs, outer shell particles, saliva and even their feces, become airborne. These contaminates become a part of the dust in your home. When breathed in by individuals that are allergic, sickness to varying degrees can occur. Individuals with asthma are especially sensitive to these type of airborne contaminates and when exposed can have increased difficulties breathing.

Bacteria

Roaches also affect our health in that they can carry many different types on bacteria on their body. Roaches are not very picky about where they hang out. Once they have exposed themselves to something gross, they can then carry any bacteria they picked up into your living and eating areas. It is uncommon for a human to directly contract a disease from a cockroach, but because cockroaches live in such large groups and multiply so quickly, you can understand how being exposed to many roaches means you are being exposed to more and more bacteria.

Chemicals

Another surprising risk posed to humans would be the chemicals we will voluntarily expose ourselves to in an effort to get rid of the roaches. Some of the most toxics substances people allow in their homes are for the use of pest control. Many of these chemicals have warnings that advise you not to touch or inhale the substance and yet we will spray and smear these products in areas where are children and pets will be wandering around on a daily basis. Thankfully, there are safer alternatives.

Keep Tidy

This seems like a no brainer, but roaches love dirty environments. They like a sink full of unwashed dishes and trash cans that should have been emptied yesterday. You can do yourself a great service by simply keeping the house, especially the kitchen, as clean as possible. Since roaches are very active at night, washing up the dishes and taking out the trash before bed can go a long way toward decreasing the roach population in your home.

Get Rid of Cardboard

Cardboard is a roach’s favorite place to hang out and breed. It’s like a roach nightclub. Any cardboard items in your home should be properly disposed of to cut down on roach activity.

Seal Up Cracks

Roaches generally come in your house from outside, so it is a good idea to seal up as many cracks as possible in your walls and floor boards. This can easily be done by purchasing an inexpensive caulking gun and simply following the directions. The fewer access points that roaches have to your house, the fewer roaches you will have in your house!


Coke – it’s a stinker! but does have some uses

20 Practical Uses for Coca Cola… Proof That Coke Does Not Belong In the Human Body

Health & FitnessNovember 23, 2013
1coketoilets

Coke is the most valuable brand in history, and “Coca-Cola” is the world’s second-most recognized word after “hello.” However, the beverage itself is an absolute poison to the human metabolism. Coke is very close to the acidity level of battery acid and consequently it can clean surfaces equivalent to and often better than many toxic household cleaners.

It’s cheaper and easier to buy Coke in some third world countries than it is to access clean water. Coke uses “public relations propaganda” to convince consumers and entire nations that it is an “environmental company” when really it is linked to pollution, water shortages, and disease.People who consume soft drinks such as Coke have a 48% increase in heart attack and stroke risk, compared to people who did not drink the sodas at all or did not drink them every day. A study published in the journal Respirology reveals that soft drink consumption is also associated with lung and breathing disorders including asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD).The carbonation in Coke causes calcium loss in the bones through a 3-stage process:

  1. The carbonation irritates the stomach.
  2. The stomach “cures” the irritation the only way it knows how. It adds the only antacid at its disposal: calcium. It gets this from the blood.
  3. The blood, now low on calcium, replenishes its supply from the bones. If it did not do this, muscular and brain function would be severely impaired.

But, the story doesn’t end there. Another problem with most Coke is it also contain phosphoric acid (not the same as the carbonation, which is carbon dioxide mixed with the water). Phosphoric acid also causes a draw-down on the body’s store of calcium.

So Coke softens your bones (actually, makes them weak and brittle) in 3 ways:

  1. Carbonation reduces the calcium in the bones.
  2. Phosphoric acid reduces the calcium in the bones.
  3. The beverage replaces a calcium-containing alternative, such as milk or water. Milk and water are not excellent calcium sources, but they are sources.

Esophageal cancer was very rare two generations ago — now, it’s common. The basic mechanism works as follows:

  1. Mechanical damage to cells is a huge risk factor for cancer. It’s why asbestos particles, for example, cause lung cancer.
  2. All soft drinks cause acid reflux (stomach acid rising up past the esophageal valve). This is more pronounced when the body is horizontal (as in sleeping), but the sheer volume of Coke and soft drinks consumed in the USA means the acid reflux is well past the danger point. Any time you ingest a gassy drink, you are going to get belching–and acid into the esophagus. How much is too much? The research doesn’t say where the limit is–it only shows that most of us are far, far, far past it.
  3. tomach acid dissolves tissue — that’s its purpose. The stomach lining does not extend into the esophagus, so the lower esophagus gets damaged by acid far more frequently in soft drink users than in non soft drink users. This results in a radical increase in cell mutations, along with a far higher level of free radicals.

20 Practical Uses For Coke

Coke acts as an acidic cleaner. The amount of acid in soda is enough to wear away at the enamel of your teeth, making them more susceptible to decay. In tests done on the acidity levels of soda, certain ones were found to have PH levels as low as 2.5. To put that into perspective, consider that battery acid has a pH of 1 and pure water has a pH of 7.

To prove Coke does not belong in the human body, here are 20 practical ways you can use Coke as a domestic cleaner:

  1. Removes grease stains from clothing and fabric
  2. Removes rust; methods include using fabric dipped in Coke, a sponge or even aluminum foil. Also loosens rusty bolts
  3. Removes blood stains from clothing and fabric.
  4. Cleans oil stains from a garage floor; let the stain soak, hose off.
  5. Kills slugs and snails; the acids kills them.
  6. Cleans burnt pans; let the pan soak in the Coke, then rinse.
  7. Descales a kettle (same method as with burnt pans)
  8. Cleans car battery terminals by pouring a small amount of Coke over each one.
  9. Cleans your engine; Coke distributors have been using this technique for decades.
  10. Makes pennies shine; soaking old pennies in Coke will remove the tarnish.
  11. Cleans tile grout; pour onto kitchen floor, leave for a few minutes, wipe up.
  12. Dissolves a tooth; Use a sealed container…takes a while but it does work.
  13. Removes gum from hair; dip into a small bowl of Coke, leave a few minutes. Gum will wipe off.
  14. Removes stains from vitreous china.
  15. Got a dirty pool? Adding two 2-liter bottles of Coke clears up rust.
  16. You can remove (or fade) dye from hair by pouring diet Coke over it.
  17. Remove marker stains from carpet. Applying Coke, scrubbing and then clean with soapy water will remove marker stains.
  18. Cleans a toilet; pour around bowl, leave for a while, flush clean.
  19. Coke and aluminum foil will bring Chrome to a high shine.
  20. Strips paint off metal furniture. Soak a towel in Coke and lay it on the paint surface.

Now can you imagine what is does to your stomach lining? 

Who needs the ‘household and cleaning’ section at the hardware store when we have Coke.

Source: “20 Establish Uses For Coca Cola Proves Itt Does Not Belong In The Human Body”, from preventdisease.com by John Summerly

Read more at: http://www.thoughtpursuits.com/20-practical-uses-coca-cola-proof-coke-belong-human-body/


Make your own fabric softener, all natural and safe

http://www.herbs-info.com/blog/how-to-make-your-own-fabric-softener-crystals/

MAKE YOUR OWN FABRIC SOFTENER CRYSTALS

Our latest discovery is an “outrageously simple” home-made alternative – fabric softener crystals. This product is typically added to laundry powder at the start of the wash in order to add a nice scent, make fabrics feel soft and help them remain static-free.

As you are probably aware, most regular cleaning products purchased at the store contain powerful chemicals – and this is for scent purposes as well as cleaning. Chances are, also, that the scent products used are industrially produced fragrance chemicals…. and as you can imagine, there are all kinds of possibilities here for health concerns.

fabric softener crystals

Are you a fan of fabric softener crystals like Purex but not a fan of the price??  Try making your own!

Yesterday as I was doing laundry I noticed I was almost out of my homemade laundry detergent. Since I am going to be gone for 4 days this week, I didn’t want to give the hubster any excuses for not doing laundry while I’m gone (I could just hear it now, “Honey, there was no laundry detergent! I COULDN’T do laundry!”) so I decided to mix up a batch.

I had all the ingredients on hand for my powdered laundry detergent recipeexcept for the Purex Crystals, so I just left it out. I decided instead to try somescented Epsom salt as a substitute. I’d recently read that you could use coarse sea salt as a substitute for fabric softener crystals…but since Epsom salt is much cheaper (and I just happened to have a huge bag of it!), I decided to try it.

The nice thing about making your own?  You can make it any scent you like!

All you need is:

  • Epsom salt
  • essential oil(s) of your choice

homemade fabric softener crystals

Start with 10 drops of essential oil per 1 cup of Epsom salt (you can add more for a stronger scent if you prefer). For my personal “signature scent” I decided to use lavender and lemon…one of my favorite combinations!

homemade fabric softener crystals

I decided to start with 4 cups of Epsom salt and added 20 drops of lavender and 20 drops of lemon. You can make as much or as little as you want…it’s simple to make more!

homemade fabric softener crystals

Give the salt a quick stir to distribute the oils and you’re ready to go!

homemade fabric softener crystals

I first tried my new “crystals” on a load of towels (1/4 cup per load added in the same time as the laundry detergent) and while the scent was more subtle than the Purex…it was definitely noticeable. Which I think is probably a good thing since I’m guessing Purex has some powerful scent chemicals in it.

I did a few more loads of clothes after the towels and each load had a nice, subtle scent and was just as soft and static-free as the laundry I’ve been doing since I started down the homemade laundry detergent road….over a year and a half ago. :-)

Just another option to consider for your homemade laundry products arsenal.  Let me know if you give it at try! :-)


Twenty Uses for Leftover Fruit and Vegetable Peels

Twenty Uses for Leftover Fruit and Vegetable Peels

By Treehugger

Don’t throw your kitchen scraps away, put them to work. The outer skins of fruit and vegetables are filled with flavor and vitamins, and most often have enough matter left in them for another go-round.

Some people are peelers, some people aren’t. Some people swear by the nutrients and fiber found in produce skins, others shy away from the taste or texture, or prefer removing the outer layer to reduce pesticide load. Regardless of your peeling preferences, citrus rinds, potato and other root/tuber peels, scooped-out avocados, and even cheese rinds all have more than one life.

Aim to use organic produce in these applications, and make sure to scrub well. And if you don’t have time or need for them at the moment, most of them can be frozen for future use.

HOME

1. Clean Greasy Messes

Before bringing out the big (toxic) cleaning guns in the kitchen, try lemon. Sprinkle affected area with salt or baking soda (to act as an abrasive) and then rub with juiced lemon halves. (Be careful using lemon on sensitive surfaces such as marble.)

2. Shine Your Coffee Pot

For the old diner trick to make glass coffee pots sparkle: Add ice, salt and lemon rinds to an empty coffee pot; swirl around for a minute or two, dump, and rinse well.

3. Clean Your Tea Kettle

For mineral deposit build up in tea kettles, fill the vessel with water and a handful of lemon peels and bring to a boil. Turn off heat and let sit for an hour, drain, and rinse well.

4. Dye Fabric

Pomegranate peels make for great coloring material. Use a stainless steel pot large enough to cover the fabric, fill with hot water and add peels, let it sit overnight. Simmer the water and peels the next day and then remove peels and add wet fabric. Simmer gently for one hour and allow to cool overnight. Remove the next day, rinse in cool water–from thereon, wash with similar colors.

FOOD

5. Make Zest

If you’ve juiced lemons, limes, oranges, or grapefruit but don’t have an immediate need for zest, you can make it anyway and dry or freeze it for future use—zest is a versatile item to have on hand for a bright boost in any number of dishes. If you don’t have a microplane or zester, you can also use the small side of a box grater. Try to scrape just the outer layer, the white layer of pith is bitter. Freeze in an airtight container. To dry, spread the zest on a towel and leave until dried, then store in a clean jar.

6. Make Citrus Extract Powder

Make zest or twists (lemons, limes, oranges, or grapefruit) being sure to remove the pith–and allow to dry, about 3 or 4 days for twists, less for zest. Put in a blender (or spice grinder) and pulverize into a powder. Store in a clean jar.

7. Make Citrus Sugar

Make citrus extract powder and add it to sugar, or you can use fresh twists, put them in a jar with sugar, let the peel’s oil infuse the sugar and remove.

8. Make Lemon Pepper

Mix lemon extract powder with freshly cracked pepper.

9. Make Citrus Olive Oil

Pound citrus peel (pith removed) in a mortar and pestle with some oil added. Place in a jar with more oil and let rest for six hours. Strain into a clean jar.

10. Make Infusions

Infuse honey or vinegar with citrus peels by placing twists and letting the flavors seep. Strain the liquid and store in a clean jar.

11. Make Potato Crisps

Mix potato peels with enough lemon juice and olive oil to evenly coat. Spread the potato peels in a layer on a baking sheet and cook at 400 degrees, stirring once, until golden brown (about 10 minutes). Season to taste.

12. Make Stock
Boil potato peels, onion skins, carrot peels, leek ends, etc for vegetable stock. (Also save fresh herb stems for this!)

13. Boost Soup and Stock

Cheese rinds (sans wax) can be placed in soup stocks for an awesome secret boost of flavor and texture.

14. Add “Meat” to Greens

Cheese rinds can also be added to braised greens for added flavor depth.

15. Keep Brown Sugar Soft

If you regularly fall victim to the brick in the pantry known as hardened brown sugar, try adding some lemon peel (with traces of pulp and pith removed) to keep it moist and pliable.

16. Make Vanilla Sugar

If you use fresh vanilla, after scraping the bean, add the pod to sugar to make vanilla-infused sugar.

BEAUTY

17. Make a Banana Sugar Scrub

Sprinkle sugar on the flesh side of banana peels and use as a soft, exfoliating loofa. Rub gently all over your body and then rinse in the shower.

18. Refresh Your Face

For a skin tonic, rub orange or grapefruit peels on your face (avoiding your eyes) and then gently rinse with warm water.

19. Moisturize

Rub the fleshy part of an avocado peel on your face for a rich moisturizer.

20. Relieve Your Peepers

Potato peels can reduce puffiness around eyes; press the moist side of the fresh peels to the skin for 15 minutes.


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