Delicious alternative toothbrush


I THREW AWAY MY REAL TOOTHBRUSH

 

and reversed six cavities

by Kyle Estes

About nine months ago I had six cavities in my mouth. Whenever I had hot, cold, sweet, or salty food, I felt excruciating pain deep in the roots of my infected teeth. As a firm believer in natural medicine, the last thing I wanted to do was go to a dentist and pay thousands of dollars to have my teeth drilled and filled with toxic metal. So for about a month I was stressing pretty hard over the health of my teeth. Then, out of the blue one day, I mentioned my cavity dilemma to a very health conscious friend of mine, who upon my mentioning reached into his pocket and pulled out what appeared to be a small wooden stick. “Have you ever cleaned your teeth with licorice root?” he questioned.

Never even heard of it. My buddy then went on to display how to turn this natural gem into a toothbrush, which is instinctively easy. I would later discover through the almighty Internet that licorice root is an antibacterial herb; which also reduces plaque and has anti-cavity functions. In addition, licorice root also has teeth whitening properties. This little stick is an overall gift to the human species from Mother Nature herself.

The moment I began cleaning my teeth with this herb, I concluded that I would never use a “real” toothbrush again. Almost instantaneously, I formulated the idea that whatever nature has been providing humans to clean their teeth with for thousands and thousands of years, has got to be better than scrubbing your teeth with nylon bristles. Look at the mouths of indigenous people, whom for the  most part, typically possess a mouthful of nearly flawless teeth. Even the skulls of cavemen depict a mouthful of nearly flawless teeth. Its obvious our ancestors were using something natural to clean their teeth.

Since the natural toothbrush discovery, I have used a nylon bristle toothbrush once and I couldn’t even finish brushing; the plastic bristles brought immediate pain to my mouth and induced gum bleeding. I actually threw my toothbrush in the garbage afterward, replacing my “real” toothbrush with the licorice stick. Nine months later, I still have all of my teeth, they’ve gotten whiter, and all of the cavities in my mouth healed. Zero cavities. Western dentistry claims that a cavity cannot be reversed once the tooth has begun decaying; which doesn’t make any common sense considering teeth are bones. If you break a bone: your body will begin to heal itself, nonetheless to promote good healing you are clearly going to have to change your lifestyle. For example, if you have a broken wrist, the last thing you should be doing is push up’s. Similarly, if you have a cavity, the last thing you should be doing is eating acidic food or scrubbing nylon bristles against your teeth and gums. Teeth are a reflection of what people put into their bodies, so the first step to a healthy mouth is an alkalizing diet. So food plays a major role, but some people’s teeth still cannot handle being scrubbed with plastic twice a day, which is where natural dental hygiene comes to aid.

To give you an idea of how much money people spend just to take care of their teeth and other strange things, here’s a few interesting notes. North Americans somehow spend around 100 billion dollars annually on dental care and oral hygiene. Hair care sits right along side dental with about 100 billion dollars spent annually. Neither compares to the 300 billion dollars that U.S. citizens spend every year on lottery tickets. Pretty bizarre.

Anyways, it’s been estimated that our entire planets’ human population could be provided proper clothing, shelter, food and water for less than 60 billion dollars. Considering there are 7 billion people on our planet, the amount of money spent annually on dental care in North America is enough to turn everyone on our planet into a multimillionaire, equaling out to somewhere around 15 million dollars per earthling. Point is; North Americans spend a shit load of money on taking care of their mouths every year. Almost all of this money is going to dentists and major corporations whose views are directly inline with the American Dental Association, the same people who religiously advocate the use of fluoride and amalgam. Fluoride and amalgam have both been linked to cause various forms of cancer, but what’s even weirder than that is how many dentists have lost their practice because they removed a patient’s amalgam fillings.

In addition to the “modern” dental industry providing consumers with poor information and unhealthy substances, there is a tremendous amount of waste accumulation and environmental damage caused by the entire oral hygiene industry. To create a nylon bristle toothbrush or a bottle of toothpaste, oil must be extracted from the ground, shipped to a refinery to be formed into plastic, shipped to a factory for processing, then finally shipped to a store for purchasing.Dentists and plastic are twentieth century inventions, very new to our world. Natural toothbrushes are herbs, aka food, which has been around for quite a while. Personal hygiene is considered to be the first step to good health. It makes sense to believe that humans are capable of managing their own personal hygiene easily and inexpensively; after all it is “personal” hygiene.

All thanks to licorice root, I have avoided dental bills, reversed all of my cavities, and spent less than 10 dollars over the past nine months on oral hygiene. Since I don’t buy toothpaste or gum anymore, I drink peppermint tea for fresh breath, which is also very inexpensive. If you have a cavity or poor dental health, try cleaning your teeth with something natural for a couple weeks and see if you notice the difference. Licorice sticks can be found at most health food stores. Herbs are awesome.

Want to learn how to use a licorice root toothbrush?
 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uk5FZIJoPtA&context=C36d8cf2ADOEgsToPDskIV6NYwe467kGvlTc0uAC9N

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