Graviola – nature’s gracious cure


 

A short video giving information on the Graviola tree

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ySuisgSBwxY#t=43

t’s been called a miracle tree. Indigenous peoples from the Amazon jungle have used the bark, leaves, roots, flowers, fruit, and seed from the graviola tree for centuries to treat heart disease, asthma, liver problems, and arthritis.

Scientists from North America learned of the legendary healing tree and, through dozens of in vitro tests, discovered its ability to destroy malignant cells of 12 different types of cancer, including ovarian, colon, breast, prostate, lung, liver, cervical, lymphoma, and pancreatic cancer.

Laboratory research showed it to be 10,000 times stronger in killing colon cancer cells than Adriamycin, a commonly used chemotherapy drug. And Graviola, unlike chemotherapy, can kill cancer cells without harming healthy cells.

Family: Annonaceae
Genus: Annona
Species: muricata
Synonyms: Annona macrocarpa, A. bonplandiana, A. cearensis, Guanabanus muricatus
Common names: Graviola, soursop, Brazilian paw paw, guanábana, guanábano, guanavana, guanaba, corossol épineux, huanaba, toge-banreisi, durian benggala, nangka blanda, cachiman épineux
Part Used: Leaves, fruit, seeds, bark, roots

…. and from naturalnews.com :

GRAVIOLA PLANT SUMMARY
Main Actions (in order):
anticancerous, antitumorous, antimicrobial, antiparasitic, hypotensive (lowers blood pressure)
Main Uses:

  1. for cancer (all types)
  2. as a broad-spectrum internal and external antimicrobial to treat bacterial and fungal infections
  3. for internal parasites and worms
  4. for high blood pressure
  5. for depression, stress, and nervous disorders

Properties/Actions Documented by Research:
antibacterial, anticancerous, anticonvulsant, antidepressant, antifungal, antimalarial, antimutagenic (cellular protector), antiparasitic, antispasmodic, antitumorous, cardiodepressant, emetic (causes vomiting), hypotensive (lowers blood pressure), insecticidal, sedative, uterine stimulant, vasodilator
Other Properties/Actions Documented by Traditional Use:
antiviral, cardiotonic (tones, balances, strengthens the heart), decongestant, digestive stimulant, febrifuge (reduces fever), nervine (balances/calms nerves), pediculicide (kills lice), vermifuge (expels worms)

Cautions: It has cardiodepressant, vasodilator, and hypotensive (lowers blood pressure) actions. Large dosages can cause nausea and vomiting. Avoid combining with ATP-enhancers like CoQ10.

Traditional Preparation: The therapeutic dosage is reported to be 2 g three times daily in capsules or tablets. A standard infusion (one cup 3 times daily) or a 4:1 standard tincture (2–4 ml three times daily) can be substituted if desired. See Traditional Herbal Remedies Preparation Methods page if necessary for definitions.

Contraindications:

  • Graviola has demonstrated uterine stimulant activity in an animal study (rats) and should therefore not be used during pregnancy.
  • Graviola has demonstrated hypotensive, vasodilator, and cardiodepressant activities in animal studies and is contraindicated for people with low blood pressure. People taking antihypertensive drugs should check with their doctors before taking graviola and monitor their blood pressure accordingly (as medications may need adjusting).
  • Graviola has demonstrated significant in vitro antimicrobial properties. Chronic, long-term use of this plant may lead to die-off of friendly bacteria in the digestive tract due to its antimicrobial properties. Supplementing the diet with probiotics and digestive enzymes is advisable if this plant is used for longer than 30 days.

 

Drug Interactions: None have been reported; however, graviola may potentiate antihypertensive and cardiac depressant drugs. It may potentiate antidepressant drugs and interfere with MAO-inhibitor drugs. See contraindications above.

Graviola Shows Promise in Cancer Cures and Arthritis

by Melanie Grimes

(NaturalNews) Graviola, or Annona muricata, is a tropical fruit that has been found to have amazing healing properties. Also called soursop guanababa, or pawpaw, the Graviola fruit, leaves, bark and roots have been used as sedatives in folk medicine. Native South American healers used the tree to heal liver, asthma, heart problems as well as arthritis. Research on Graviola has shown good results in test tube studies, but there have been no clinical trials on animals or humans, even though the plant shows remarkable healing potential. The plant grows in South and Central America and has been cultivated for its healing properties for over three thousand years.

The first modern-day research on Graviola was conducted in 1976 by the National Cancer Institute, though the plant has been under investigation since the 1940s. Their findings reported that the leaves of the Graviola plant were effective in destroying malignant cancer cells. Tests at Perdue University on cancer cells of prostate, pancreas and lungs have all shown results. Twenty further studies investigated the chemical effects of the Graviola in laboratory tests, but tests on animals or humans are needed to confirm the results. A Korean study found that Graviola killed colon cancer cells better than a chemotherapy drug called Adriamycin. Graviola results were ten thousand times stronger than the chemotherapy. And, unlike chemotherapy drugs, Graviola did not damage any cells except the carcinogenic cells. This means that there would likely be no hair loss or nausea as side effects from using Graviola as a treatment for cancers.

In the traditional folk medicine of Graviola seeds are used to help eliminate parasites. In Guyana, the leaves are used as both a sedative and a heart tonic. Brazilians drink Graviola tea for relief of liver problems, and apply the oil from the seeds to relieve arthritis and rheumatism. In Jamaica and the West Indies, the fruit is eaten to reduce fevers and to treat diarrhea.

The active ingredients in Graviola are called Annonaceous acetogenins. These substances have shown strong anti-tumor effects in test tubes, and what is more promising is that small doses seem to have great effect. Research using one part per million has shown results.

There are over two thousand varieties of plants in the Annonaceae species worldwide, many of which may provide additional sources of useful medicines for mankind. It is hoped that further research will enable this plant, used for millennium in folk medicine, to find its rightful place in modern science and global healing.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/8760865
http://www.pawpawresearch.com/purdue-mdr-97….
http://www.drweil.com/drw/u/QAA400299/gravio…
http://www.hort.purdue.edu/newcrop/1492/anno…
http://www.rain-tree.com/graviola.htm

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One Comment on “Graviola – nature’s gracious cure”

  1. […] This means that there would likely be no hair loss or nausea as side effects from using Graviola as a …read more […]


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