Cultured Veggies – immune system boosters

Learn How to Make Cultured Veggies at Home

to Boost Your Immune System

June 01, 2013 | 192,426 views

By Dr. Mercola

Your digestive tract is probably the most underappreciated system of your body, often ignored until its screams of discontent become loud enough to grab your attention.

By the time your gut reaches this degree of disgruntlement, the problems have usually been developing for months — or years — and are challenging to resolve.

Instead of waiting for obvious signs of a problem, why not perform some regular “gut maintenance” that will lessen your chances of developing a problem in the first place?

Your gut is much more than a food processing tube — it houses about 85 percent of your immune system. This is in large part due to the 100 trillion bacteria that live there, both good and bad that can stimulate secretory IgA to nourish your immune response.

When your GI tract is not working well, a wide range of health problems can appear, including allergies and autoimmune diseases. If you suffer from any major illness, you simply will NOT be able to fully recuperate without healing and sealing your gut. Balancing the menagerie of microorganisms that occupy your GI tract is a key part of maintaining your immune health, which will be the focus of this article.

Your stomach is where digestion really gets rolling, with the introduction of more enzymes and a whole lot of acid. Fortunately, your stomach is uniquely designed for this process, as it is SO acidic. Its lining must actually regenerate at a feverish pace — just to keep up with the continuous digestion of itself! You require a brand new stomach lining every few days.

Your Stomach Actually Protects You from Infections

A recent article in Scientific American1 explores an alternate explanation about how your stomach works. The “sieve hypothesis” suggests your stomach may operate as a sieve or filter, preventing some of the more harmful microbes from passing through to your small intestine. Evidence for this is not new. It comes from a 1948 study by Dr. Orla-Jensen, a retired professor from the Royal Danish Technical College — a study that has essentially been “lost” in the literature for more than 60 years.

The professor argued that your stomach uses acid to kill pathogenic disease-causing bacteria, fungi, viruses, worms and protozoa, while allowing the more beneficial microbes (which are acid-tolerant) to pass through. If your stomach is unsuccessful at killing these pathogens, then they can dominate your intestines, damaging and eroding your intestinal walls and causing illness.

Your stomach generally becomes less acidic as you age, particularly after age 70. In his study, Orla-Jensen compared the gut bacteria of young people with that of healthy seniors, as well as with seniors suffering from dementia. He found that as people age, they have a greater proportion of pathogenic microbes to beneficial microbes in their intestinal tracts. This was particularly pronounced in seniors with dementia… which begs the question about whether dementia could actually be caused by an “intestinal infection.”

A study done at UC Davis found that E. coli and salmonella bacteria in mice produce fiber-like structures very similar to the inflammatory brain plaques seen in people with Alzheimer’s disease2. Your brain is shaped by bacteria in your digestive tract. Bacteria in your gut actually control how your brain cells express specific genes.3 Other studies report that disturbed gut flora in seniors contributes to accelerated aging, frailty and premature death.

More research is needed in order to understand the exact relationship between dysbiosis and dementia. But at the very least, these studies underscore the importance of maintaining high levels of beneficial bacteria in your intestinal tract. In fact, this bacterial community may be in charge of your entire metabolism.

Unhappy Gut Bacteria May Make You Fat

Inflammation from bacterial endotoxins may be a factor helping to drive the obesity epidemic.4 Junk food causes nasty microbes to bloom and friendly bugs to decline, just as sugar and refined carbohydrates feed the bacteria in your mouth that are responsible for tooth decay. Sugar and processed foods make your “friendly” microbe community unfriendly — even downright hostile. Humans today have lost the microbial diversity that once kept us healthy.

When dysbiosis occurs, bacteria release noxious byproducts called endotoxins. Endotoxins increase the permeability of your gut wall (“leaky gut syndrome”) and make their way into your bloodstream, triggering system wide inflammation. It’s been shown that the hypothalamus, which houses the appetite control center of your brain, is often inflamed and damaged in obese individuals. When inflammation affects your brain, and especially your hypothalamus, your entire metabolism changes.

So, here’s how it goes…

When you consume junk foods, certain bacteria flourish and produce endotoxins, which your immune system detects and, interpreting these endotoxins as an attack, responds with inflammation. Your body changes its metabolism to redirect energy for “battle.” The result is overproduction of insulin, increased fat storage, dampening of your appetite control signals, and eventually obesity. The best way to reverse this inflammation and restore a healthy metabolism is by eliminating excess sugar and processed food, and adding more friendly, beneficial bacteria from naturally fermented foods.

Cultured Vegetables Are the Ultimate Superfood

One of the leading experts in the optimization of intestinal flora is Dr. Natasha Campbell-McBride, who developed the GAPS nutritional protocol (Gut and Psychology Syndrome/Gut and Physiology Syndrome). For decades, Dr. McBride has successfully treated adults and children with severe illnesses, including autism, epilepsy, mood disorders, arthritis, multiple sclerosis, celiac disease and many more, with her GAPS protocol.

A key component of the GAPS program is the daily consumption of fermented foods. Fermented foods are potent chelators (detoxifiers) and contain much higher levels of probiotics than probiotic supplements, making them ideal for optimizing your gut flora. In addition to helping break down and eliminate heavy metals and other toxins from your body, beneficial gut bacteria perform a number of surprising functions, including:

Please click this link to watch a video on How to do your own

http://articles.mercola.com/sites/articles/archive/2013/06/01/fermented-vegetables.aspx

Introducing Cultured Vegetables into Your Diet — The Right Way

Download Interview Transcript:

http://mercola.fileburst.com/PDF/ExpertInterviewTranscripts/InterviewCarolineBarringer.pdf

Now that you understand the importance of optimizing your GI flora, let’s take a look at just how easy it is to accomplish this task by making fermented vegetables at home, in your own kitchen. If you aren’t accustomed to these foods, you may have to work them into your diet gradually. Many folks really enjoy the taste of fermented vegetables, which really have a pleasantly salty-tart flavor.

According to nutritional consultant Caroline Barringer, just one quarter to one half cup of fermented veggies, eaten with one to three meals per day, can have a dramatically beneficial impact on your health.

If you’ve never eaten fermented foods, too large a portion may provoke a healing crisis, which occurs when the probiotics kill off pathogens in your gut. When these pathogens die, they release potent toxins. If you are new to fermented foods, you should introduce them gradually, beginning with as little as one teaspoon of sauerkraut with a meal. Observe your reactions for a couple of days before proceeding with another small portion, and increase your dose gradually, as tolerated.

Realize that many food preferences develop very early in life, so the sooner you can introduce fermented vegetables to your child, the better. Traces of the flavors of the foods mothers eat are perceptible in their breast milk and amniotic fluid. Babies whose mothers eat things like garlic or broccoli while pregnant tend to be more likely to enjoy these foods later in life.

Making Cultured Veggies at Home: Equipment Checklist

Culturing your own vegetables is not difficult, but as with anything, having the right tools makes the job much easier and more fun. I have spent the last six months streamlining the process and refining my basic recipe. One of the key ingredients though is the starter culture. We are in the middle of a very extensive testing process to provide a culture that will give you large amounts of vitamin K2 in your fermented vegetables. We hope to have that available later this year if all goes well. In the meantime, you can use the following kitchen tools to make your own fermented vegetables:

  1. Food Processor: You’ll be cutting up large quantities of raw vegetables, which is very labor intensive without a food processor. Make sure yours has a shredding disc, as a typical S-blade will result in too fine a chop, which makes for a pulpier, mushier end product.
  2. Juicer: My own experimentation has resulted in selecting celery juice as the basic brine for my cultured veggies, making a juicer necessary.
  3. Good Knives: Make sure you have a set of good quality, sharp knives for prepping your vegetables.
  4. Cutting Board: A large, sturdy cutting board is a must.
  5. Very Large Bowl: This bowl should be large enough to hold the entire batch of shredded veggies, so a large capacity stainless bowl is a necessity.
  6. Canning Jars: Basic wide-mouthed 32-ounce Mason jars are all that is necessary for both fermenting and storing the vegetables. These are inexpensive and easy to find at your local hardware store, grocery, or online. Make sure they are wide-mouthed, as you’ll need to get your hand or a tool down into the jar for tightly packing the veggies.
  7. Krautpounder: This solid wood tool that looks like a small baseball bat is very handy for tightly packing the shredded veggies into your jars and eliminating air pockets.

Fresh vegetables are important components of a...

Making Cultured Veggies at Home in Six Easy Steps

The following are the basic steps to making wonderful cultured vegetables at home. For additional information, refer to our previous article on this topic.

    1. Vegetable and Herb Selection: The first step is gathering up your veggies. Make sure they are all organic. Cabbage (red or green) should be the “backbone” of your blend, comprising about 80 percent (I use green). Choose dense, tightly packed heads. Five or six medium-sized cabbages will yield 10 to 14 quart jars of fermented vegetables. Remember to reserve some cabbage leaves for the jar tops (see Step 3).

Add in hard root vegetables of your liking, such as carrots, golden beets, radishes and turnips. Peel your veggies as the skins can impart a bitter flavor. I also enjoy adding red bell pepper, Granny Smith apples, and even a hot pepper, like a habanero (make sure you wear gloves!). One pepper for the entire batch is plenty.

Aromatics can be added in small quantities — a little goes a long way, as fermenting concentrates the pungent flavors. Tasty additions include peeled garlic, peeled ginger, and herbs such as basil, sage, rosemary, thyme, or oregano. Onions tend to overpower the mix, no matter how little are used, so I avoid them.

Finally, you can add sea vegetables or seaweed to increase the mineral, vitamin, and fiber content. You can add pieces of whole dulse, or use flakes. Wakame and sea palm do not have any kind of fishy flavor but need to be presoaked and diced into the desired size. Arame and hijaki DO have a fishy flavor.

  1. Culture and Brine: For your brine, I recommend using a starter culture dissolved in celery juice. One quart of celery juice is adequate for 10 to 14 quarts of fermented veggies. While you can do wild fermentation (allowing whatever is naturally on the vegetable to take hold), this method is more time consuming, and the end product is less certain. Inoculating the food with a starter culture speeds up the fermentation process. I currently recommend using two of our Complete Probiotics as the starter culture until we get our refined version which will make more vitamin K2.
  2. High Vitamin K2 Starter Culture As I said above, we are in the middle of a very extensive testing process to provide a culture that will give you large amounts of vitamin K2 in your fermented vegetables and we hope to have that available later this year if all goes well. In the meantime i recommend using two of our Complete Probiotic Capsules for every quart of fermented vegetables as that is very close to what our final culture will be.
  3. Packing the Jars: Once you have your shredded veggies and brine mixture combined in your large bowl, tightly pack the mixture into each Mason jar, and compress using a masher to remove any air pockets. Top with a cabbage leaf, tucking it down the sides. Make sure the veggies are completely covered with brine and that the brine is all the way to the top of the jar, to eliminate trapped air. Put the lids on the jars loosely, as they will expand due to the gases produced in fermentation.
  4. Fermentation: Allow the jars to sit in a relatively warm place for several days, ideally around 72 degrees Fahrenheit. During the summer, veggies are typically done in three or four days. In the winter, they may need seven days. The only way to tell when they’re done is to open up a jar and have a taste. Once you’re happy with the flavor and consistency, move the jars into your refrigerator.
  5. Storage: Refrigerating your vegetables drastically slows down the fermentation. They will keep for many months this way, continuing to mature very slowly over time.
  6. Enjoy! Always use a clean spoon to take out what you’re eating. Never eat out of the jar, as you will contaminate the entire batch with bacteria from your mouth. Make sure the remaining veggies are covered with the brine solution before replacing the lid.

Source : http://articles.mercola.com/sites/articles/archive/2013/06/01/fermented-vegetables.aspx


Aid Digestion Naturally

Ways to Improve your Digestion

Naturally with much Ease

 

A slow digestion makes you sit with an upset stomach. Trying some ways to improve your digestion is a good way to treat a distressed abdomen. Doing simple changes in your lifestyle can help you out in this case. Choose organic foods over junk foods and canned foods. Boxed foods contain harsh preservatives and very less nutrients and vitamins. Mix raw and cooked foods; for example, combine raw salad and cooked carrots. This helps in incorporating the enzymes that are important for a healthy digestion process. Here are some more wonderful suggestions to ease an ill digestive health.

Important Tips to Improve Digestion Naturally

Water– Drink a good amount of warm or hot water as it treats constipation. This problem causes imbalances of food and harmful bacteria in the digestive tract. There occurs inflammation in the intestinal lining called intestinal permeability. Increased water intake to reduce this digestive illness.

Fermented foods– Start taking fermented foods. They contain bacteria that aid in a good digestion. It treats constipation problem. These bacteria help to absorb vitamins and minerals. A reduction in cholesterol level in the body occurs.

Figs

Fiber– Increase the intake of fiber-rich foods. They reduce inflammation from the digestive tract, and improves all over digestion process. You can get this nutrient from foods like apples, flaxseed, beans, and dried fruits like dates, figs and prunes.

Papaya– Small portions of papaya add natural enzymes in your body. They help in carrying out a fine digestive process. You can enjoy a papaya dessert or just eat its raw form.

Take a glass of water and add lemon juice and salt, and then drink this mixture. This will remove extra bile from your liver. It helps in breaking down food and aid in a healthy digestion. Do around 15-30 minute workout daily. It helps in carrying out a normal and easy digestive process. However, if you are suffering from a severe form of any digestive illness then consult a good medical professional.

Suggested Reading:
how to boost metabolism – know the tips to remain healthy forever  
junk food destroys control over appetite making you eat more  

top 10 diet tips you can’t afford to miss to remain healthy


Probiotics – may help with cancer

Probiotics

probiotics

Research presented in 2009 at the 3rd International Immunonutrition Workshop in Spain demonstrated a link between milk fermented containing the probiotic strainLactobacillus helveticus and delayed growth of breast tumors. The study found that fermented milks can inhibit tumor growth by reducing the inflammatory response in cases of hormone-dependent breast cancer models and induced colon cancer.

Probiotics are also known as lactobacillus acidophilus (L. acidophilus), Bifidobacterium bifidus and lactic acid bacteria. These are all healthy bacteria that are similar to the good bacteria that resides in the intestinal tract. Sometimes people do not have enough good bacteria in their system. Probiotic foods can increase levels of healthy bacteria. However, only live strains help. The ideal probiotics are those that contain large amounts of living microorganisms, such as multiple Bifido and Lactobacillus strains. At least three billion live bacteria per serving is best.

Probiotics and the immune system

Probiotics help to strengthen the immune system and prevent diseases. By improving gut health, probiotics boost the body’s immune defenses, which in turn fight infections. The intestinal tract is home to between 70 and 80 percent of the body’s immune cells. If the immune cells are functioning well the body is more resistant to infection. Hepatitis B, hepatitis C, the human papillomavirus (HPV) and Helicobacter pylori are the four primary infections linked to cancer. Combined, these four infections cause around 1.9 million cancer causes annually. Probiotics are particularly helpful in reducing vaginal and urinary infections.

Probiotic supplements, foods and doses

Yogurt is the food most commonly associated with probiotics but there are several others. Unfermented and fermented milk contain probiotics. Kefir is another dairy product that is a probiotic food. Non-dairy sources include tempeh, miso and some soy drinks and juices.

Probiotics are also sold in supplement form. Probiotic supplements come in tablet, capsule and powder forms. Supplements may contain 1 to 10 billion bacteria.

Probiotic foods and supplements may help with cancer prevention as well as several other conditions. Probiotics can help with diarrhea and other digestive problems. They may also assist with elimination, allergies and weight management.

Sources for this article include:
http://journals.cambridge.org
http://breastcancerconqueror.com/probiotics-and-cancer/
http://www.breastcancer.org


Probiotics – what are they?

Health Basics: What are probiotics?

Probiotics – health basics

probiotic

by S. D. Wells

(NaturalNews)

Probiotics are Nature’s truest form of antibiotics.

These microscopic organisms (microflora) help the body build long-lasting immunity to a host of illnesses and diseases, including allergies, irritable bowels, viruses, bacterial infections, and yes, cancer!

No vaccination or prescription medicine in the world could ever come close to this safe and beneficial way of balancing the body’s billions of microbes.

Probiotics not only help create this balance but also help maintain it for years and years, hence the name probiotic, which means “for life.” (http://www.usprobiotics.org/basics.asp)

This all natural way of supplementing your defense system is vital in today’s frightening, non-nutritional jungle of toxic food and medicine. Many people, especially in the United States, are surrounded by bad influences, and though the number of organic enthusiasts is on the rise, there exists a wealth of information regarding immunity and natural defense against chemicals and toxic food “agents” which slips past the guards and invades our system, attempting to inflict damage on our DNA. (http://www.bioinventia.com/probiotec.html)

Probiotic cultures prevent damage before it occurs

Probiotic cultures not only prevent damage from being done to our cells, they strengthen our immune system and beat down cancer cells before they ever have a chance of multiplying. Probiotics weaken mutagenic activity, so your good cells keep winning the battles, and most importantly, the DNA war.

The majority of microbes in the intestine are not harmful, but rather play an important role in normal growth and development, but when the balance or pH is thrown out of whack, especially in the intestines, major problems begin doing “structural” damage to our system, and reinforcement is often needed, above and beyond a healthy diet. Also, probiotics can be used to counter the over-consumption of antibiotics so typical in the average American diet, which is often chock full of non-organic meats and dairy products that come from animals shot up with varying forms of antibiotics. Antibiotics are also prominent in municipal drinking water, because it’s “too expensive” for cities to filter them out.

It has been estimated that there are more bacterial cells (microbes) in the human body than there are cells. If you know high school math, there are bacterial cells numbering around 10 to the 14th power, or 100,000,000,000,000. Break that down into an estimated 1,000 different species, which make their homes in humans. Like all animals, humans have microbes on our skin, in our mouths, in our stomachs, our digestive tracts, and in other private places. But wait, before you go internet hunting for pictures of bacteria located in the intestines or the colon, watch out because you’re computer may need updated “virus” protection too!

Eliminate ignorant fear and learn about your inner ecosystem

Just as Earth and Mother Nature have a delicate balance which needs to be maintained, our bodies have their own “inner ecosystem,” which is like having a rainforest in your digestive track. When your ecosystem is balanced, your intestines are teeming with beneficial bacteria and micro flora to keep your immune system strong.

Consuming probiotics native to the human digestive tract encourages the production of antibodies, which in turn protects the system from allergies, infections (viral, fungal and bacterial), IBS, and cancer. In fact, probiotics build defense against disease by enabling your body to build a natural defense, unlike vaccinations.

Vaccines are now often crossbred viruses, bacterial strands, mixed up with aluminum and formaldehyde, which shock the system into a panic type of reaction, which is a form of “wild guess” methodology for establishing only short term immunity at best.

Populating your “gut” with beneficial micro flora improves your skin, helps maintain healthy weight, and provides energy and overall well-being. Many people who have never heard of probiotics or don’t understand their function may be “turned off” to the concept if educated improperly at first. (http://www.renewlife.com)

Benefits of a healthy gut

The second someone reads a typical probiotic label or description reading something like, “Over 6 billion bacteria in each tablet,” it seems overwhelming, and some consumers might set the product back on the shelf, but at that point, they’re selling themselves short of a healthy gut.

Probiotics benefits: here’s where a little education goes a long way:
• protects babies and children from future allergies.
• aids in digestion.
• fights off viral, fungal and bacterial infections.
• helps saliva enzymes in the mouth, throat, and esophagus break down food before it ever reaches the stomach and intestines.
• balances chime (gastric juices in stomach) which complete the breakdown of proteins, fats and carbohydrates before food leaves the stomach!
• helps body absorb nutrients (opposite action of soda) in first 4 to 6 hours, before gastrointestinal acids reach them.
• helps expel food within 24 hours, before it starts becoming a toxin in your system, affecting your immunity.
• aids with lactose intolerance, helping intestinal microbes produce vitamins (very important for people with IBS and Crohn’s disease).
• builds resistance to pathogenic bacteria.
• acts on pre-carcinogenic and mutagenic compounds that induce genetic mutation.

Smart shoppers look for enteric coated probiotics, which have a special coating so they are protected as they pass through the stomach and reach the intestines, where most of the microbial balancing is needed. Other conditions that may improve quickly from probiotic supplementation include: diarrhea, elevated blood cholesterol, hypertension, kidney stones, necrotizing enterocolitis, oral health, and vaginosis.

If all of these descriptions boggle the non-medical mind or aren’t easily “digestible,” just remember that probiotics equip your entire body with DNA armor against toxins that try to attack your cells. In fact, artificial sweeteners are one of the greatest cancer causing food agents because they trick the body into ingesting them because they taste sweet. Beware of the big three: Aspartame, Sucralose and Sorbitol, especially!

Disease is no joke. Your body needs armor to fight the good fight. Supplement with Nature’s best kept secret and never let the “Trojan horses” of the food, drink, and medicine world sneak into your temple (body) and attack your Royal forces.

Sources for this article include:

http://www.usprobiotics.org/basics.asp

http://www.bioinventia.com/probiotec.html

http://nutritionbyte.wordpress.com/

http://www.health.harvard.edu/fhg/updates/update0905c.shtml

http://www.usprobiotics.org/basics.asp

http://www.naturalnews.com/031293_probiotics_children.html

http://www.healingdaily.com/detoxification-diet/probiotics.htm

http://bodyecology.com


The Gut – our mainline defense!

Viruses Worldwide Battled by Gut Microbes

By Dr. Mercola

Source:

http://articles.mercola.com/sites/articles/archive/2012/07/14/gut-microbes-for-healthy-immune-system.aspx?e_cid=20120714_DNL_artNew_1

Three recent studies highlight the importance of maintaining a healthy gut to avoid disease and optimize your health. The first, published in the journal Celli, shows that “host-specific microbiota appears to be critical for a healthy immune system.”

According to Medical News Todayii:

 “Because the intestinal microbiota can regulate immune responses outside the gut, the absence of the ‘right’ gut microbes may conceivably shift the balance toward disease in individuals genetically predisposed to autoimmune diseases,” they write, noting that our relationship with our gut microbiome today may be threatened by a combination of heavily processed foods, frequent treatment with antibiotics, and advances in hygiene.

… Although modern medicine and technology may offer alternative ways to fight disease, Kasper says, “the current prevalence of autoimmune diseases – such as asthma, multiple sclerosis, and inflammatory bowel disease – may be, at least in part, the consequence of the increasing vulnerability of the coevolved human-microbe relationship.”

Gut Microbes in Constant Combat with Viruses

You’ve probably heard that about 80 percent of your immune system resides in your gut, and the next study underscores this fact. It also provides yet another clue as to the kind of constant pressure your gut bacteria is under to keep your immune system humming.

The study, featured in Genome Researchiii, looked at a common set of viruses linked to gut bacteria in humans. These viruses, which feed off bacteria, are called phages, and they pose a constant threat to the health of the bacterial community living in your gut.

Phages can actually outnumber bacteria 10 to 1, which in itself is a testament to the power of your beneficial gut bacteria (and by extension your immune system) to keep disease at bay. But it also helps explain why just a few days of careless eating can sometimes make you feel a bit listless, or why chronic poor health is at such epidemic levels.

Between chemical assaults, inadequate nutrition, excessive sugar consumption and an overabundance of natural viral “co-hosts,” your microflora has one heck of a job to maintain order and balance… And as soon as that balance is thrown off kilter, it will begin to reflect in your immune function.

How Your Gut Flora Influences Your Health

An earlier study published in the April issue of Nutrition in Clinical Practicev also shows that microorganisms in the human gastrointestinal tract form a highly intricate, living fabric of natural controls that affect body weight, energy, and nutrition.

A couple of the key findings in this study were that each individual’s community of gut microbes is unique, and the groundwork for each person’s gut flora is laid from birth. In fact, the mode of delivery during the birthing process has been shown to affect an infant’s microbial profile. This is in part why it’s so important for pregnant women to become mindful of their gut health, as it will affect not just their own health, but also that of their child. It’s not a static thing, however. Your gut flora is highly susceptible to environmental changes, and can rapidly respond to alterations in diet for example.

Dr. Natasha Campbell-McBride‘s research also demonstrates the dynamic interaction between your gut, your brain, and your immune system, starting from birth.

Watch the interview with Dr Campbell-McBride:

http://articles.mercola.com/sites/articles/archive/2012/07/14/gut-microbes-for-healthy-immune-system.aspx?e_cid=20120714_DNL_artNew_1

She has developed what might be one of the most profoundly important treatment strategies for a wide range of neurological, psychological, and autoimmune disorders—all of which are heavily influenced by your gut health. I believe her Gut and Psychology Syndrome, and Gut and Physiology Syndrome (GAPS) Nutritional program is vitally important for MOST people, as the majority of people have such poor gut health due to poor diet and toxic exposures, but it’s particularly crucial for pregnant women and young children. Children born with severely damaged gut flora are more susceptible both to disease and to vaccine damage, which may help explain why some children develop symptoms of autism after receiving one or more childhood vaccinations, while others do not.

Previous research has also shown that your microflora has a significant impact on gene expression, such as the genes responsible for vitamin biosynthesis and metabolism. Probiotics have been found to influence the activity of hundreds of your genes, helping them to express in a positive, disease-fighting manner—some of which affect your body in a manner resembling the effects of certain medicines!

“Reseeding” Your Gut with Fermented Foods and Probiotics

Maintaining optimal gut flora, and ‘reseeding’ your gut with fermented foods and probiotics when you’re taking an antibiotic, may be one of the most important steps you can take to improve your health. If you aren’t eating fermented foods, you most likely need to supplement with a probiotic on a regular basis, especially if you’re eating a lot of processed foods. Poor diet in general, and each course of antibiotics extols a heavy price, as it tends to wipe out the beneficial bacteria in your gut, giving pathogens free rein to proliferate unchecked.

Historically, people used to get large quantities of beneficial bacteria, i.e. probiotics, straight from their diet in the form of fermented or cultured foods, which were invented long before the advent of refrigeration and other forms of food preservation. As a result, they didn’t suffer the same kinds of problems with their gut health as so many do today.

It’s worth noting that each mouthful of fermented food can provide trillions of beneficial bacteria—far more than you can get from a probiotics supplement, which will typically provide you with colony-forming units in the billions.  I thought this would be a good analysis, so I tested fermented vegetables produced with our probiotic starter culture to determine their probiotic potency and was astounded to discover they had 10 trillion colony-forming units of bacteria. Literally, one serving of vegetables was equal to an entire bottle of a high potency probiotic!

Fermented foods also give you a wider variety of beneficial bacteria, so all in all, it’s a more cost effective alternative. Fermenting your own foods can provide even greater savings, and is actually easier than you might think. To learn more, please listen to my interview with Caroline  Barringer, a Nutritional Therapy Practitioner (NTP) who has been involved with nutrition for about 20 years. She’s now one of Dr. Campbell-McBride’s chief training partners, helping people understand the food preparation process.

Watch the interview with Dr Campbell-McBride :

http://articles.mercola.com/sites/articles/archive/2012/07/14/gut-microbes-for-healthy-immune-system.aspx?e_cid=20120714_DNL_artNew_1

Please refer to the original article by Dr Mercola, which can be found here :

http://articles.mercola.com/sites/articles/archive/2012/07/14/gut-microbes-for-healthy-immune-system.aspx?e_cid=20120714_DNL_artNew_1